"Therefore if the Son makes you free, you shall be free indeed."

Friday, January 8, 2010

Assumptions, Logic, Faith, Delight & Dreaming Big

January 7, 2010
Folded: several tax receipts
Stuffed: said tax receipts into envelopes
Watched: the Alabama Crimson Tide roll over Texas in the football championship bowl game
Mailed: a note to a friend
Stayed: home all day


From Wild Goose Chase . . .

Speaking on assumptions, logic, faith and trying to explain the supernatural, Mark says this:

"Instead of embracing the mystery, we come up with human explanations for supernatural phenomena. Instead of living in wonderment, we try to make the Omniscient One fit within the logical limits of our left brain. And if I may be so bold, I honestly don't think this makes us smart. I think it makes us small-minded. And God isn't the one diminished. We are." (pg. 71)

"The more faith you have, the fewer assumptions you will make. Why? Because with God all things are possible."

By the way this chapter speaks of Abraham, and God getting Abraham out of his tent to count the stars. Mark suggests often we make assumptions based on our view of the eight-foot ceilings around us when we need to go outside at night and consider the One Who hung the moon and sprinkled all those stars across the heavens. Notice the difference? When we assume the ceiling's the limit, we don't dream, we don't believe all things are possible. But when we consider the moon and the stars and the One Who made them and His desire to work through us, we realize anything is possible with God!

"Faith is not logical. But it isn't illogical either. Faith is theological. It does not ignore reality; it just adds God into the equation. Abraham 'faced the fact.' But he was also 'fully persuaded' that God had the power to deliver on His promise. Faith is not mindless ignorance; it simply refuses to limit God to the logical constraints of the left brain." (pg. 79)

I love that. So often I limit life to reality instead of dreaming. Do you believe God puts dreams into our hearts? One psalm instructs us to delight ourselves in the Lord and He will give us the desires of our hearts. If I understand this verse correctly when we delight in the Lord, His desires become our desires and God wants to give us those things. So why limit life to the sometimes dreary "realistic" outlook ahead of us? Take God into the equation! See the future through His eyes and realize with Him nothing is too difficult! Indeed, anything is possible!

What is something you have in your heart to do, but maybe you've tried to squelch that dream or passion because it's just sooooo unrealistic that it seems it will never happen? Have you limited God by your assumptions and logic? Have you ever stood outside on a clear night and been amazed by the awesomeness of God as you gazed into the sky? Or maybe you've had this experience while hiking in the mountains or while considering the vastness of the ocean or desert or simply by observing a newborn baby or the flowers in your yard. Do tell!


4 comments:

Amber said...

It's a flaw of the 'west', that we want to *explain* everything. We don't want to accept that there are some things for which no explanation is possible, or even necessary. We pride ourselves on logic and our 'smartness', and we know what pride goes before, right?

As for the ceiling, well, it's never stopped me, but I can see how, we live in boxes, essentially. We've so taken over the natural world with things that are man made, that it's become hard for many to see the glory and wonder of the God-made.

Nocturnal Queen said...

I've always been a dreamer. I think my husband would say I'm too much of one. But I can't imagine not having dreams.

Wrestling With Religion said...

"The more faith you have, the fewer assumptions you will make."

I really like that!

Susanne said...

Amber, loved this: "We've so taken over the natural world with things that are man made, that it's become hard for many to see the glory and wonder of the God-made."

Niki, I think it's great to have dreamers. Keep on dreaming. :)

Sarah, thanks!